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    Sara Lyons
    @saralyons1993

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Did you turn a corner in #FiDi and accidentally end up in the Roman Forum? Don’t worry! You haven’t traveled through time! You found New York City’s #CivicCenter, centered around Foley Square! It’s full of neoclassical architectural monoliths holding courts and municipal offices, all encased in marble and stone. It’s grand, it’s quiet, and it’s truly awe-inspiring in its scale. Definitely take a stroll through the Civic Center when you come to visit New York, or even if you’ve just never been south of SoHo - you don’t have to be taking someone to court to appreciate the beauty of the home of our court systems! #makethemostofnyc #nycarchitecture
Did you turn a corner in #FiDi  and accidentally end up in the Roman Forum? Don’t worry! You haven’t traveled through time! You found New York City’s #CivicCenter , centered around Foley Square! It’s full of neoclassical architectural monoliths holding courts and municipal offices, all encased in marble and stone. It’s grand, it’s quiet, and it’s truly awe-inspiring in its scale. Definitely take a stroll through the Civic Center when you come to visit New York, or even if you’ve just never been south of SoHo - you don’t have to be taking someone to court to appreciate the beauty of the home of our court systems! #makethemostofnyc  #nycarchitecture 
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You might have noticed that Greenwich Village is full of purple and white - my Instagram posts have mirrored this lately. That’s because #NYU ranks in the top 5 of NYC’s biggest private landowners by almost every measurement - wealth, square feet of apartment space, number of addresses held, and more. NYU innovated in higher education here in New York, by creating a school with no set campus. Compared to the campus-based and [at the time] conservative Columbia University, this liberal and geographically radical university was a breath of fresh air in city academia. The buildings scattered around lower Manhattan turned the whole city into NYU’s campus. The university has absorbed and preserved historic buildings and built new structures, feeding academic money from the university’s hefty tuition bills back into our city’s economy! #makethemostofnyc #nyccolleges #GreenwichVillage #nycarchitecture
You might have noticed that Greenwich Village is full of purple and white - my Instagram posts have mirrored this lately. That’s because #NYU  ranks in the top 5 of NYC’s biggest private landowners by almost every measurement - wealth, square feet of apartment space, number of addresses held, and more. NYU innovated in higher education here in New York, by creating a school with no set campus. Compared to the campus-based and [at the time] conservative Columbia University, this liberal and geographically radical university was a breath of fresh air in city academia. The buildings scattered around lower Manhattan turned the whole city into NYU’s campus. The university has absorbed and preserved historic buildings and built new structures, feeding academic money from the university’s hefty tuition bills back into our city’s economy! #makethemostofnyc  #nyccolleges  #GreenwichVillage  #nycarchitecture 
These brownstones, now known as #NYU’s Trustees Row, were the homes of such great artists and poets as Rockwell Kent, Edward and Jo Hopper, and E. E. Cummings. Today, they’re the home of NYU’s Center for Social Work, and my favorite place to daydream about living on Washington Square! Next time you’re in Greenwich Village, stop by Washington Square North and dream with me! #makethemostofnyc #nycarchitecture #GreenwichVillage #seeyourcity
These brownstones, now known as #NYU ’s Trustees Row, were the homes of such great artists and poets as Rockwell Kent, Edward and Jo Hopper, and E. E. Cummings. Today, they’re the home of NYU’s Center for Social Work, and my favorite place to daydream about living on Washington Square! Next time you’re in Greenwich Village, stop by Washington Square North and dream with me! #makethemostofnyc  #nycarchitecture  #GreenwichVillage  #seeyourcity 
The Asch Building, now an #NYU facility not far from #WashingtonSquare, was once the home of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. This factory, staffed by immigrant and first-generation American women who lived on the Lower East Side, made affordable and washable cotton blouses for active women in athletics and the workplace, which replaced dress-waists, the stuffier, more expensive, and more restrictive option for upper body clothing at the time. For all of the feminist advances that the shirtwaist could enable, however, the women who made them often suffered in sub-standard working conditions. Some of them even held strikes for their rights as employees in 1910, with very little success. Their eventual return to work without their demands being met was a foreboding omen of things to come. On March 25, 1911, 146 people (123 women and 23 men) lost their lives in a fire in this factory - between the dusty and fibrous condition of their air and work surfaces, and the fact that the doors to the factory floors were locked from the outside (to prevent unauthorized breaks and theft by workers), AND their height off of street level on the upper floors, this fire proved to be quick-moving, lethal, and just too far out of reach to put out. In the wake of this tragedy, our city has made great strides to protect its workforce, from making it illegal to lock your workers into their workspace to improving firefighting technology, helping us reach fires high up in the air. And every year on March 25th, we hold a ceremony and parade to remember the lives lost that day, and all the women who moved our city to never let anything like that happen again, if we have any say in the matter. #makethemostofnyc #GreenwichVillage #nycarchitecture #triangleshirtwaistfire
The Asch Building, now an #NYU  facility not far from #WashingtonSquare , was once the home of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. This factory, staffed by immigrant and first-generation American women who lived on the Lower East Side, made affordable and washable cotton blouses for active women in athletics and the workplace, which replaced dress-waists, the stuffier, more expensive, and more restrictive option for upper body clothing at the time. For all of the feminist advances that the shirtwaist could enable, however, the women who made them often suffered in sub-standard working conditions. Some of them even held strikes for their rights as employees in 1910, with very little success. Their eventual return to work without their demands being met was a foreboding omen of things to come. On March 25, 1911, 146 people (123 women and 23 men) lost their lives in a fire in this factory - between the dusty and fibrous condition of their air and work surfaces, and the fact that the doors to the factory floors were locked from the outside (to prevent unauthorized breaks and theft by workers), AND their height off of street level on the upper floors, this fire proved to be quick-moving, lethal, and just too far out of reach to put out. In the wake of this tragedy, our city has made great strides to protect its workforce, from making it illegal to lock your workers into their workspace to improving firefighting technology, helping us reach fires high up in the air. And every year on March 25th, we hold a ceremony and parade to remember the lives lost that day, and all the women who moved our city to never let anything like that happen again, if we have any say in the matter. #makethemostofnyc  #GreenwichVillage  #nycarchitecture  #triangleshirtwaistfire 
You may not have ever heard of the Provincetown Players before, but you’ve definitely heard of their work. Susan Glaspell’s Trifles, the gripping one-act about two women accidentally unraveling a murder mystery that no man could solve, premiered in the company, as did many of Eugene O’Neill‘s plays. The company no longer works out of its old Greenwich Village home, which stood on the site seen here (the original building was torn down, supposedly for structural reasons), NYU maintains the spirit of the Provincetown Players in this theater education facility, where they host an annual play reading series of new works for young audiences by prominent or significant American playwrights like the ones who made their home here 100 years ago. #makethemostofnyc #GreenwichVillage #nyctheater
You may not have ever heard of the Provincetown Players before, but you’ve definitely heard of their work. Susan Glaspell’s Trifles, the gripping one-act about two women accidentally unraveling a murder mystery that no man could solve, premiered in the company, as did many of Eugene O’Neill‘s plays. The company no longer works out of its old Greenwich Village home, which stood on the site seen here (the original building was torn down, supposedly for structural reasons), NYU maintains the spirit of the Provincetown Players in this theater education facility, where they host an annual play reading series of new works for young audiences by prominent or significant American playwrights like the ones who made their home here 100 years ago. #makethemostofnyc  #GreenwichVillage  #nyctheater 
This beautiful heart installation in Times Square is no coincidence - the city commissions a heart-themed piece for Father Duffy Square every February for Valentine’s Day! This year’s installation, “Window to the Heart,” refracts surrounding billboard lights to take on the color of the surrounding area. Get your sweetheart snapshot here before the installation leaves at the end of the month! #makethemostofnyc #nycart #loveislove #timessquare
This beautiful heart installation in Times Square is no coincidence - the city commissions a heart-themed piece for Father Duffy Square every February for Valentine’s Day! This year’s installation, “Window to the Heart,” refracts surrounding billboard lights to take on the color of the surrounding area. Get your sweetheart snapshot here before the installation leaves at the end of the month! #makethemostofnyc  #nycart  #loveislove  #timessquare 
This is perhaps one of the most famous monuments in New York City. The #WashingtonSquareArch, seen here from next to the fountain in Washington Square Park, was originally opened to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of George Washington becoming America’s first president, in April 1789 at Federal Hall in what is now #FiDi. The original arch was made out of plaster locals loved it so much that in 1892, New York city officials replicated it in marble, making it a permanent structure. It currently stands over Ai Wei Wei’s #GoodFencesMakeGoodNeighbors installation, and spends most Christmases standing over the Washington Square Christmas tree. It also overlooks the closest thing NYU students have to a campus quad, in the form of Washington Square Park. There is one story you may not have heard about this monument, however. On January 23, 1917 six young artists (including Marcel Duchamp and Gertrude Drick) decided to sneak into the Washington Square arch and throw a party on top of it. they declared of the park they gazed over to be the “Free and Independent Republic of Washington Square.” The new country was distinctly pacifist, bohemian, and full of youthful exuberance. The older and more conservative residents of the neighborhood did not appreciate this tomfoolery, and soon afterwards the door to the top of the arch was secured shut. But I spite of the curmudgeonly folks living near this monument 101 years ago, the arch, the park, and the surrounding neighborhood are steeped in rebellious bohemian culture to this day. #makethemostofnyc #nycmonuments #GreenwichVillage
This is perhaps one of the most famous monuments in New York City. The #WashingtonSquareArch , seen here from next to the fountain in Washington Square Park, was originally opened to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of George Washington becoming America’s first president, in April 1789 at Federal Hall in what is now #FiDi . The original arch was made out of plaster locals loved it so much that in 1892, New York city officials replicated it in marble, making it a permanent structure. It currently stands over Ai Wei Wei’s #GoodFencesMakeGoodNeighbors  installation, and spends most Christmases standing over the Washington Square Christmas tree. It also overlooks the closest thing NYU students have to a campus quad, in the form of Washington Square Park. There is one story you may not have heard about this monument, however. On January 23, 1917 six young artists (including Marcel Duchamp and Gertrude Drick) decided to sneak into the Washington Square arch and throw a party on top of it. they declared of the park they gazed over to be the “Free and Independent Republic of Washington Square.” The new country was distinctly pacifist, bohemian, and full of youthful exuberance. The older and more conservative residents of the neighborhood did not appreciate this tomfoolery, and soon afterwards the door to the top of the arch was secured shut. But I spite of the curmudgeonly folks living near this monument 101 years ago, the arch, the park, and the surrounding neighborhood are steeped in rebellious bohemian culture to this day. #makethemostofnyc  #nycmonuments  #GreenwichVillage 
This is a #TBT to the beginning of this month, when I got to see my dearest Brian in his college production of Merrily We Roll Along! There are tons of schools across NYC training the Great White Way’s next stars, and he is definitely one of those! If nothing on Broadway is whetting your appetite, try looking into what NYC’s universities are doing! #makethemostofnyc #nyctheatre #marymountmanhattan #tonightsbill
This is a #TBT  to the beginning of this month, when I got to see my dearest Brian in his college production of Merrily We Roll Along! There are tons of schools across NYC training the Great White Way’s next stars, and he is definitely one of those! If nothing on Broadway is whetting your appetite, try looking into what NYC’s universities are doing! #makethemostofnyc  #nyctheatre  #marymountmanhattan  #tonightsbill 
Happy Valentine’s Day from me and my friends at the New-York Historical Society where this pro-suffrage postcard can be seen in their “Hotbed” exhibit which focuses on the women’s suffrage movement as seen in Greenwich Village! You can catch this exhibit at 77th St. and Central Park West through March 25th! #makethemostofnyc #nycmuseums #womensrights #feminism #greenwichvillage #newyorkhistoricalsociety
These statues on the south side of #CentralPark commemorate three great South American revolutionaries. #SimonBolivar, #JoseMarti and #JoseDeSanMartin sit astride their horses, as if surveying the land before battle, respectively. Their voices and their sabers helped to liberate Venezuela, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Panama, Cuba, Argentina, and Chile from Spanish colonialism. If you too want to be inspired alongside so much of Latin America, check them out on 59th St. And if you go today, say a special hello to Jose Marti - it’s his birthday! #makethemostofnyc #nycparks #statuesofnyc
These statues on the south side of #CentralPark  commemorate three great South American revolutionaries. #SimonBolivar , #JoseMarti  and #JoseDeSanMartin  sit astride their horses, as if surveying the land before battle, respectively. Their voices and their sabers helped to liberate Venezuela, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Panama, Cuba, Argentina, and Chile from Spanish colonialism. If you too want to be inspired alongside so much of Latin America, check them out on 59th St. And if you go today, say a special hello to Jose Marti - it’s his birthday! #makethemostofnyc  #nycparks  #statuesofnyc 
This place has got to be one of my favorite museums in all of New York City. The New-York Historical Society, located just south of the AMNH on Central Park West, is filled to the brim with amazing artifacts from our city’s history. Their current exhibits include their model train collection, an examination of the Vietnam War (on view through 4/22), a collection of gorgeous and intricate maps from America’s War for Independence (on view through 3/11), a brilliant exhibit on Greenwich Village’s role in the fight for women’s suffrage (on view through 3/25), letters and pamphlets from the life of Frederick Douglass, a history of Time magazine, and so much more. Some of my favorite past exhibits have been their telling of the story of the Battle of Brooklyn Heights, an exhibit hall all about the first Jewish families in New York, and of course their gorgeous permanent collection, including the two most shade-filled curatorial choices I have ever seen. As you approach their large exhibit hall on the first floor, you’ll see a wall of artifacts to your left. On that wall there are portraits of Aaron Burr and Theodosia Burr in profile, positioned so that they are looking at each other. The only problem? Alexander Hamilton, Burr’s long time rival and eventual dueling victim, is in between them, getting in the way of them seeing each other in the museum just as Hamilton’s political aspirations and untimely demise did in real life. And just below them and to the viewer’s right there is a portrait of a wealthy woman that was once attributed to a politician - not as the artist, but as the subject. I’m not sure that the true subject of the painting would appreciate the museum’s curators calling her “a woman of questionable beauty” any more than she would appreciate her portrait being attributed to an allegedly scandalous drag queen, but I think both are hilarious! #makethemostofnyc #nycmuseums
This place has got to be one of my favorite museums in all of New York City. The New-York Historical Society, located just south of the AMNH on Central Park West, is filled to the brim with amazing artifacts from our city’s history. Their current exhibits include their model train collection, an examination of the Vietnam War (on view through 4/22), a collection of gorgeous and intricate maps from America’s War for Independence (on view through 3/11), a brilliant exhibit on Greenwich Village’s role in the fight for women’s suffrage (on view through 3/25), letters and pamphlets from the life of Frederick Douglass, a history of Time magazine, and so much more. Some of my favorite past exhibits have been their telling of the story of the Battle of Brooklyn Heights, an exhibit hall all about the first Jewish families in New York, and of course their gorgeous permanent collection, including the two most shade-filled curatorial choices I have ever seen. As you approach their large exhibit hall on the first floor, you’ll see a wall of artifacts to your left. On that wall there are portraits of Aaron Burr and Theodosia Burr in profile, positioned so that they are looking at each other. The only problem? Alexander Hamilton, Burr’s long time rival and eventual dueling victim, is in between them, getting in the way of them seeing each other in the museum just as Hamilton’s political aspirations and untimely demise did in real life. And just below them and to the viewer’s right there is a portrait of a wealthy woman that was once attributed to a politician - not as the artist, but as the subject. I’m not sure that the true subject of the painting would appreciate the museum’s curators calling her “a woman of questionable beauty” any more than she would appreciate her portrait being attributed to an allegedly scandalous drag queen, but I think both are hilarious! #makethemostofnyc  #nycmuseums 
These two gorgeous statues can be seen outside of the New York Historical Society on the corner of 77th and Central Park West. If you pass Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln on your way to AMNH, the Historical Society, or Central Park, be sure to say hello - these are two of New York’s favorite Americans, both in their time and in ours! Both men were politically divisive in their time for fighting against slavery, and both caught more than their fair share of heat from the public for doing so, but in the end, New York had their back in the fight against slavery, and the people of this city persist to this day in fighting for social progress and equality. These beautiful statues are a reminder of the moral and cultural foundations of New York, of all the things we stand for, and of how much more we have left to fight for equality in America. (They’re also perfectly placed on stairs for photo ops with tourists of all heights!) #makethemostofnyc #statuesofnyc #UWS
These two gorgeous statues can be seen outside of the New York Historical Society on the corner of 77th and Central Park West. If you pass Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln on your way to AMNH, the Historical Society, or Central Park, be sure to say hello - these are two of New York’s favorite Americans, both in their time and in ours! Both men were politically divisive in their time for fighting against slavery, and both caught more than their fair share of heat from the public for doing so, but in the end, New York had their back in the fight against slavery, and the people of this city persist to this day in fighting for social progress and equality. These beautiful statues are a reminder of the moral and cultural foundations of New York, of all the things we stand for, and of how much more we have left to fight for equality in America. (They’re also perfectly placed on stairs for photo ops with tourists of all heights!) #makethemostofnyc  #statuesofnyc  #UWS 
Back when #NewYorkCity was a British colony, this steeple was the first thing people would see on the horizon as they approached Manhattan by ship. It’s a brilliant metallic grey, eye-catching even in between the skyscrapers that dwarf it today. #StPaulsChapel is officially the oldest church building in Manhattan, and it’s seen more than 250 years of our history in its life, including the Great Fire of New York, the Civil War, every ticker tape parade NYC has ever had, and 9/11, when it became a care station for excavation crews working at Ground Zero just feet away from its back door... #makethemostofnyc #seeyourcity #nycarchitecture
Back when #NewYorkCity  was a British colony, this steeple was the first thing people would see on the horizon as they approached Manhattan by ship. It’s a brilliant metallic grey, eye-catching even in between the skyscrapers that dwarf it today. #StPaulsChapel  is officially the oldest church building in Manhattan, and it’s seen more than 250 years of our history in its life, including the Great Fire of New York, the Civil War, every ticker tape parade NYC has ever had, and 9/11, when it became a care station for excavation crews working at Ground Zero just feet away from its back door... #makethemostofnyc  #seeyourcity  #nycarchitecture 
The #MeatpackingDistrict has become a sort of secret hiding place for brilliant street art, and art on the street! I fell in love with Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe at St. Bernard’s, with its fence’s gorgeous pop of color against that classic intricate stone carving on the building’s front face... #nycarchitecture #seeyourcity #makethemostofnyc
The #MeatpackingDistrict  has become a sort of secret hiding place for brilliant street art, and art on the street! I fell in love with Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe at St. Bernard’s, with its fence’s gorgeous pop of color against that classic intricate stone carving on the building’s front face... #nycarchitecture  #seeyourcity  #makethemostofnyc 
In my tour guiding life with @newyorktour1 and Inside Broadway Tours, we sometimes have occasion to spend a little time in the Marriott at Times Square. This behemoth of a hotel is the largest in NYC, and features a few fun lounges to hang out in when the weather gets too cold for outdoor adventures, some super snazzy bathrooms, and this absolutely nutty elevator structure, exposed and visible up 44 floors... #makethemostofnyc #seeyourcity #nychotels
In my tour guiding life with @newyorktour1 and Inside Broadway Tours, we sometimes have occasion to spend a little time in the Marriott at Times Square. This behemoth of a hotel is the largest in NYC, and features a few fun lounges to hang out in when the weather gets too cold for outdoor adventures, some super snazzy bathrooms, and this absolutely nutty elevator structure, exposed and visible up 44 floors... #makethemostofnyc  #seeyourcity  #nychotels 
See that gorgeous creature on the right in this picture? That, my friends, is the Titanosaur. She’s MASSIVE - 122 ft long, with a rib cage big enough to fit a NYC studio apartment inside - and she has her own room on the 4th Floor of the #AmericanMuseumofNaturalHistory. She’s also very new. Her scientific name was only established in August last year! I think she’s as good a reason as any for first-time visitors to make the trek to the Upper West Side, and for old familiar faces to swing by for another visit! #makethemostofnyc #museumsofnyc
See that gorgeous creature on the right in this picture? That, my friends, is the Titanosaur. She’s MASSIVE - 122 ft long, with a rib cage big enough to fit a NYC studio apartment inside - and she has her own room on the 4th Floor of the #AmericanMuseumofNaturalHistory . She’s also very new. Her scientific name was only established in August last year! I think she’s as good a reason as any for first-time visitors to make the trek to the Upper West Side, and for old familiar faces to swing by for another visit! #makethemostofnyc  #museumsofnyc 
Guys, I’m so excited! The Helen Hayes Theatre is coming back! Originally named the Little Theatre, it was Broadway’s smallest theatre, seating just 299 before a balcony was installed, bringing its seat count up to just 597 (or 589, depending on who you ask - either way, it’s tiny). It has lived several lives in the past 106 years, as a TV studio (with Merv Griffin!), lecture hall, and theatrical stage. Its current name even has its own history - the original Helen Hayes was torn down in the Great Theatre Massacre of 1982, and this theatre was re-christened in its honor. Now, this former home of Rock of Ages, Torch Song Trilogy, and The Humans is getting ready to reopen post-renovation with Chris Evans in “Lobby Hero,” followed by “Straight White Men” featuring Armie Hammer, which will be the first play written by an Asian-American woman to be presented on Broadway. The theatre might have a new name by then, but it’ll still carry on the legacy of everyone who ever loved it. Here’s to Second Stage Theatre, and to new beginnings! #makethemostofnyc #nyctheatre #seeyourcity
Guys, I’m so excited! The Helen Hayes Theatre is coming back! Originally named the Little Theatre, it was Broadway’s smallest theatre, seating just 299 before a balcony was installed, bringing its seat count up to just 597 (or 589, depending on who you ask - either way, it’s tiny). It has lived several lives in the past 106 years, as a TV studio (with Merv Griffin!), lecture hall, and theatrical stage. Its current name even has its own history - the original Helen Hayes was torn down in the Great Theatre Massacre of 1982, and this theatre was re-christened in its honor. Now, this former home of Rock of Ages, Torch Song Trilogy, and The Humans is getting ready to reopen post-renovation with Chris Evans in “Lobby Hero,” followed by “Straight White Men” featuring Armie Hammer, which will be the first play written by an Asian-American woman to be presented on Broadway. The theatre might have a new name by then, but it’ll still carry on the legacy of everyone who ever loved it. Here’s to Second Stage Theatre, and to new beginnings! #makethemostofnyc  #nyctheatre  #seeyourcity